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Category: Asia

Memo to a Tourist Traveling to Thailand

Memo to a Tourist Traveling to Thailand

We recommend that you apply for visas at the Consulate of the Kingdom of Thailand in Moscow, as it takes about 2 hours to process a visa upon arrival. Before leaving for the airport, check the availability of the following documents: a foreign passport (valid for at least 6 months), an air ticket, a voucher, an insurance policy, a bank statement (when exporting more than $ 3,000 (from 15.03.03) per person), a power of attorney from parents ( if a…

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Republic of Buryatia (Russia)

Republic of Buryatia (Russia)

Arshan, Republic of Buryatia (Russia) The Arshan health resort is located in the Tunkinskaya valley (southern spurs of the Eastern Sayan Mountains) at an altitude of 893 m above sea level. 70 km south of Arshan is the regional center Kyren. Translated from the Buryat name of the resort means “healing water”, this is the name of all the healing springs of the area. Arshan began to develop at the beginning of the 20th century in a picturesque area surrounded…

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What to See in Langkawi (Malaysia)

What to See in Langkawi (Malaysia)

According to Ehangzhou.org, Langkawi is an archipelago consisting of 99 islands. The largest of them is Palau-Langkawi, where the largest number of tourists come. Langakwi is a modern resort with long sandy beaches, developed infrastructure, numerous shops and picturesque nature. Langkawi means “red eagle” in Malay. Eagles with brick-colored wings really live here, and in one of the towns – Kuah – there is a huge “monument” to this bird. At the pier of this city, located in the southeast of…

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What to See in Kaesong (North Korea)

What to See in Kaesong (North Korea)

According to Allpubliclibraries.com, Kaesong is located 125 km south of Pyongyang near the border with South Korea. Kaesong was the capital of the first unified state of Goryeo from the 10th to the 14th centuries. At that time, the city was surrounded by three rows of fortifications, parts of which have survived to this day. In Kaesong, you can see the Namdae-mun gate, which was left from the inner fortification wall that surrounded the royal palace. The gate was badly…

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Christmas Island General Information

Christmas Island General Information

General information: According to A2zdirectory.org, this island was annexed by Great Britain in 1888 after the discovery of a large deposit of phosphates on it. Geography Location: Southeast Asia, an island in the Indian Ocean, south of Indonesia. Geographic coordinates: 10° 30’S latitude, 105° 40′ E Reference map: Southeast Asia. Area: total: 135 sq. km.; land surface area: 135 km2; water surface area: 0 km2 Comparative area: about 0.7 of the area of ​​Washington, DC. Land borders: 0 km. Coastline:…

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General Information About India

General Information About India

GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION According to directoryaah, India lies between 8 and 36 degrees north latitude and between 68 and 97 degrees east longitude. From the west, India is washed by the Arabian Sea, from the east – by the Bay of Bengal, and the southern tip with Cape Kumari – by the open Indian Ocean. India shares borders with Pakistan, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. RELIEF. India is often divided into seven natural regions: the Himalayas, the Indo-Gangetic lowlands (plain), the Central Highlands,…

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Malaysia Population and Economic Conditions

Malaysia Population and Economic Conditions

Population The population (21,410,000 residents According to an estimate of 1998), with very high annual growth rate (8. 800. 000 children under 18 years in 1995), presents a wide variety of ethnic groups and cultures. The 62 % (the Bumiputra) is of Malaysian origin and practice Islam, while the rest are of Chinese origin (29 %, of the Buddhist religion) and India (8 %, of Hindu religion) and other minor ethnic groups (in Borneo the most important ethnic groups are…

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Hainan Island, China

Hainan Island, China

Imagine a tropical island with rare plants and animals, mysterious volcanoes covered with a network of forests, and friendly aborigines welcoming you on the shore. A sea of ​​sun and fruits, pearly clouds float across the diamond sky and are reflected in the emerald water… No, this is not paradise. This is Hainan Island. According to agooddir, Hainan is located in the south of China. According to the similarity of its outlines with the coastline of the Leizhou Peninsula, scientists…

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Turkey Food

Turkey Food

CHICKEN DISHES In Anatolian villages, as a rule, people wake up not to the ringing of alarm clocks, but to the crowing of a rooster that is heard at sunrise. The gardens and yards of Anatolian villages are filled with the hubbub of children who compete with the rooster brethren and the clucking of numerous hens. In the morning, fresh chicken eggs are served for breakfast. In suburban areas, chickens and roosters are bred in almost every house, from which…

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Traditions and Customs of Japan

Traditions and Customs of Japan

In Japan, they honor and cherish their national traditions no less than in England. What distinguishes the Japanese from the inhabitants of foggy Albion is the flexibility with which they adapt millennial customs to the modern way of life. Sakura Cherry and sakura are practically the same thing. True, unlike European cherries, fragile sakura flowers do not bear fruit. Their flowering is fleeting, therefore it is especially valuable. During the blooming of the buds of this amazing tree, the whole…

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Vietnam Country Overview

Vietnam Country Overview

According to findjobdescriptions, Vietnam is a socialist people’s republic in Southeast Asia with a one-party system whose motto is independence, freedom and happiness. Vietnam’s capital is Hanoi. The country has a long history of colonization, war, division and reunification. An overview of Vietnam’s history The earliest human traces from the region of today’s Vietnam go back to antiquity. The production of ceramics and the cultivation of rice were known to the people living here three millennia BC. From 111 BC…

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Emigration to Malaysia

Emigration to Malaysia

Area: 330,290 km² Residents: 32,049,700 (2017 estimate) Population density: 97 E / km² Form of Government: federal, electoral parliamentary monarchy System of Government: parliamentary Neighboring countries: Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore, Brunei Capital: Kuala Lumpur National language: Malay Religions: 60% Muslims (State religion), 20% Buddhists, 9% Christian religions, 6% Hindus, 2.6% Taoists and Confucianists, 0.02% Jehovah’s Witnesses Currency: Ringgit (MYR) 1 MYR = 100 Sen Exchange rates: Indo -China-Time (UTC + 8) 1 EUR = 4.91 MYR 100 MYR = 20.35 EUR 1 CHF = 4.45 MYR 100 MYR = 22.43…

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Turkmenistan Population and Economy

Turkmenistan Population and Economy

HUMAN GEOGRAPHY According to 800zipcodes, the population density is 12 residents / km², with even lower concentrations in the central and desert part of the territory. The country is in strong numerical expansion: the growth coefficient was 2.6% per year in the five-year period 1987-92 and has remained high even after independence. The population, of Turkmen language and Muslim religion, is constituted for 79.2% by Turkmen (or Turkmen), then by Russians (3%) and Uzbeks (9%); there are also small communities…

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Cambodia vs Laos

Cambodia vs Laos

Laos Vientiane is the capital of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic. It has almost 200,000 inhabitants. All of Laos has 6,834,942 inhabitants in an area of ​​236,800 square kilometers. Until July 19, 1949, Laos was under French colonial rule. The head of state is Choummaly Sayasone and the head of government is Bouasone Bouphavanh. Laos has no coast. It borders Myanmar, Cambodia, Vietnam, China and Thailand. Laos is the only landlocked country in Southeast Asia. Nine tenths of the country…

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South Korea Territory and History

South Korea Territory and History

MORPHOLOGY The geological origin of the region now occupied by the country is similar to that of the contiguous North Korea. The country is characterized by a moderate mountainous area, albeit with mostly senile forms due to the long erosive action it has undergone; this mountainousness is accentuated in the central-eastern section, while to the west the flat areas prevail. The reliefs have a meridian trend and none of them reach 2000 m in height. The main range is that…

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The Kashmir Conflict Part 4

The Kashmir Conflict Part 4

Sharp UN criticism In June 2018, the UN Human Rights Council published its first report on violence in Kashmir. The report spans the period January 2016 to April 2018 and directs particularly sharp criticism at India, including for “chronic impunityfor violence perpetrated by the security forces ”. The Council criticizes the Indian Law (Armed Forces Special Powers Act) of 1990 which states that soldiers in Kashmir cannot be prosecuted without the consent of the central government. According to the report, Indian forces committed 145…

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The Kashmir Conflict Part 3

The Kashmir Conflict Part 3

Armistice and terrorist attacks After all, peace activists have occurred. In November 2000, India declared a unilateral ceasefire during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. The ceasefire was then extended three times. It was considered the most serious peace invitation from India in eleven years. According to consistent information, the shooting around the control line largely stopped during this period. But the guerrillas did not interrupt their attacks. Most militant groups dismissed the ceasefire as “Indian propaganda.” It was not long before as many people had…

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The Kashmir Conflict Part 2

The Kashmir Conflict Part 2

Muslim guerrillas In the late 1980s, the conflict took a new turn when Muslim guerrillas entered the struggle for the part of Kashmir that India controls. During the 1980s, dissatisfaction with the Indian government had increased, especially with the advance of the Indian security service in the area. At the same time, a wave of revival swept through the Muslim world. Kashmiri youths went to Pakistan for military training and weapons, guerrilla groups were formed and a series of assassination attempts were carried…

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The Kashmir Conflict Part 1

The Kashmir Conflict Part 1

For 70 years, India and Pakistan have been fighting over Kashmir in the Himalayas and Karakorum mountain ranges. In 1949, the conflict led to the division of the border into an Indian and a Pakistani part. But no peace agreement was reached. Since then, peace efforts have been replaced by escalating violence. The world is concerned about the Kashmir conflict because both India and Pakistan have nuclear weapons. The conflict arose when British India in 1947 was divided into two independent states: the secular (non-religious) India,…

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The Conflict in Yemen

The Conflict in Yemen

Since 2015, Yemen has witnessed a war that the UN has described as the worst in the world. UN organizations have estimated that 20 million Yemenis risk starvation if the war does not end and large quantities of supplies can be imported. There have been deep conflicts in Yemen long before the war of recent years. The population is divided between Sunni and Shia Muslims, society is made up of clans, it is full of weapons and the country has never had…

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How the state of Israel came to be Part II

How the state of Israel came to be Part II

Palestinian nationalism When a united Arab nation seemed impossible to realize, more and more Arab nationalists in Palestine began working for an independent Palestinian state instead. It did not necessarily mean a purely Arab or purely Muslim state. Jewish minorities have long existed in the Arab world, and Christian Arabs made up at least one-fifth of the population of Palestine at that time. The Arabs were politically divided, and they had different views on the Jewish immigrants who already existed in Palestine. In…

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How the state of Israel came to be Part I

How the state of Israel came to be Part I

At the end of the 19th century, Jews from Europe began to immigrate to Palestine to create their own country. As immigration increased in the early 20th century, conflicts arose with the Arabs living in the area and the Arabs began working to establish an independent Palestinian state. When the UN after World War II proposed that Palestine be divided into a Jewish and an Arab part, the Arabs said no. The Jews then proclaimed the state of Israel, which was immediately attacked…

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The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 4

The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 4

Palestinian division Divorce on the Palestinian side contributes to all failed peace attempts. Under Palestinian law, the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO) is to negotiate with Israel. Islamist Hamas has not cared about what the PLO agrees with Israel. Hamas has not recognized Israel’s right to exist and does not officially negotiate Israel and Hamas with each other. Between Hamas and Fatah, the dominant movement in the PLO, an acute conflict erupted after the Palestinian elections in 2006 that Hamas won. When the parties could…

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The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 3

The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 3

The fate of the refugees The Palestinian refugees and their descendants are today over five million, according to the UN. In Gaza, almost four-fifths are refugees from Israel, compared to just under a third of Palestinians in the West Bank. Outside the West Bank and Gaza, the largest refugee groups are in Jordan (almost two million) and in Lebanon. Israel refuses to recognize that refugees have the right to return, but for Palestinian leaders, the right to return is a very important…

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The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 2

The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 2

Israel entered a new phase in 1977, with the right-wing bloc Likud’s election victory. Until then, all governments had been led by the Labor Party, which had admittedly allowed Jewish settlements on occupied land but had not encouraged the expansion as Likud did. Likud’s policies resulted in large settlements for Israelis in the West Bank, where Palestinian frustration grew at the same rate as fears of occupying power diminished. In the autumn of 1987, stone-throwing youths began an uprising, the Intifada. The Israelis…

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The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 1

The Israel – Palestine Conflict Part 1

The conflict between Israelis and Palestinians may seem simple at first: two peoples are competing for the same land. But during all the years that the conflict has been unresolved, more and more complications have arisen. The conflict concerns today’s Israel as well as the West Bank and Gaza, which Israel occupied during the Six-Day War in 1967. Prior to World War II, these areas were part of the so-called Palestine Mandate, administered by Britain on behalf of its predecessor, the…

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The Conflict in Iraq Part 4

The Conflict in Iraq Part 4

Islamic State new threat In 2013 and 2014, violence increased sharply again. In January 2014, Sunni extremists, who called themselves the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (Isis), occupied parts of the Sunni-dominated province of Anbar. Despite the violence, parliamentary elections could be held on 30 April. As expected, no alliance gained its own majority, but the rule of law, an alliance formed by al-Maliki, was clearly the largest and al-Maliki thought he had a good chance of remaining. Criticism of him for pursuing…

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The Conflict in Iraq Part 3

The Conflict in Iraq Part 3

Concern in the Sunni Triangle The two leading Kurdish parties would also take part in shaping the future of Iraq: the Conservative Kurdistan Democratic Party (KDP) and the more left-wing Kurdistan Patriotic Union (PUK). The KDP was led by Massoud Barzani and the PUK’s leader was Jalal Talabani. The Shia religious Muslims had two dominant political movements. The oldest is al-Dawa al-Islamiyya (The Islamic Calling). During the war between Iraq and Iran, the movement was severely persecuted and many members fled to Iran. In…

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The Conflict in Iraq Part 2

The Conflict in Iraq Part 2

War against Iran and Kuwait Due to border disputes and fears that the Shia Muslim Iranian revolution would spread to Iraq, Saddam Hussein attacked Iran in September 1980. The Western powers, who were also concerned about the situation in Iran, supported Iraq. Saddam Hussein was able to buy weapons from both the West and the East and also received financial support from the Arab states. During the war, the Kurds began an uprising with the support of Iran. After some Kurdish successes,…

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The Conflict in Iraq Part 1

The Conflict in Iraq Part 1

In April 2003, the United States and Britain launched a war against Iraq as Saddam Hussein’s regime was portrayed as a threat to the outside world with weapons of mass destruction and contacts with al-Qaeda terrorists. But the motives for the invasion were false. The vision of “spreading democracy” to the Middle East also proved unsuccessful. On the contrary, the invasion contributed to the disintegration of Iraq and became a real threat to the outside world. The war ended, however, for a regime…

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Higher Education System in India

Higher Education System in India

Study in India: higher education system The number of higher education institutions in India has increased massively since independence. Although almost 40 percent of the Indian population is under 20 years of age, just twelve percent of a given year group are studying. For comparison: in Germany it is currently around 46 percent. Due to the immense population, there are still eleven million students who enroll in more than 560 Indian higher education institutions. Especially since the 1990s, the need…

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Study in Japan

Study in Japan

The island nation of Japan is located south of the Asian mainland in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. According to 800zipcodes, Japan is made up of a chain of four main islands and several minor islands. Almost sixty percent of its area of over 378,000 square kilometers belongs to the centrally located and largest island of Honshū, which is also known as the Japanese heartland. North of it are Hokkaidō and southwest Shikoku and Kyūshū. Study in Japan –…

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MU Review

MU Review

Application As with every semester abroad, the application is unfortunately associated with a lot of paperwork, but you can get everything done quickly once you have started. MicroEDU always helps you if you don’t understand something, checks all application documents and then sends them to the university yourself. The time until you have a response depends on how early you send the application. So you don’t have to worry if nothing has come after a few weeks. As soon as…

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Yemen Education

Yemen Education

Training The goals of the school in Yemen are set in a law passed by Parliament in 1992. In addition to providing the country with qualified labor, the school will promote Islamic principles and values. In 1993, the school had two different structures: 6 + 3 + 3 year courses in the country’s north and 8 + 4 in its south. The new law requires the introduction of a 9 + 3 structure throughout the country. Schooling is compulsory for…

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Vietnam Education

Vietnam Education

In Vietnam, it is officially a five-year compulsory school. The primary school is five years old and starts when the children are six years old. Then follows four-year high school and three-year high school. 800zipcodes: Offers geography, such as location and climate of Vietnam. Also includes recent population data. Primary school Almost all children start in primary school. According to Bridgat, equal educational opportunities for all are an important political goal in the country, and education is being used as…

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Uzbekistan Education

Uzbekistan Education

Training Since independence, Uzbekistan has made legislative changes to reform the country’s education system. Among other things, they have worked to replace the Cyrillic alphabet with a Latin written language. Although the written language reform was officially implemented in 2005, both writing systems are used in parallel (2017). 800zipcodes: Offers geography, such as location and climate of Uzbekistan. Also includes recent population data. As in other post-Soviet states, great emphasis is placed on emphasizing the indigenous language in education, even…

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United Arab Emirates Education

United Arab Emirates Education

According to Bridgat, the education system in the United Arab Emirates consists of 2-year preschool, 6-year primary school, 3-year secondary school and 3-year secondary school. It is compulsory school for 6 years (primary school). In practice, almost 100% of the children go to primary school in the primary school. class. Less than half of the school attendance starts in secondary school, and less than 25% attend high school. 800zipcodes: Offers geography, such as location and climate of United Arab Emirates….

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Turkmenistan Education

Turkmenistan Education

School duty was introduced under Soviet rule, and illiteracy was virtually eradicated. It is now 9 years of compulsory schooling from the children is 7 years. The primary school is divided into a child stage (3 years) and a youth stage (6 years). 2-year upper secondary schools are under construction, as well as 1- to 2-year vocational schools. Most schools teach Turkish in the national language, but it is also taught in Russian, Uzbek and Kazakh. Until the beginning of…

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Turkey Education

Turkey Education

Training In 1924, Kemal Atat邦rk closed the religious-affiliated schools in an effort to give the education system a secularized, Western orientation. Literacy campaigns in connection with the introduction of the Latin alphabet were of great benefit to the school system. At the same time, there is still extensive illiteracy especially in rural areas, not least in the country’s eastern parts and especially among women (20% over 15 years, for men 4% are reported). The high nativity has long negatively affected…

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Thailand Education

Thailand Education

In 1996, the free and compulsory school in Thailand was expanded from 6 to 9 years from the age of 6. In 2000, 87% of the relevant age group attended primary school. According to Bridgat, the high school is 6 years (3 + 3 years). The country has 20 state and 13 private universities and a host of colleges and other learning centers. There are many private schools at all levels. According to UNESCO in 2002, illiteracy among the adult…

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